Seeds

Two things about the seeds I buy. First, I like to buy organic microgreen seeds. This ensures that I'm getting a variety which is already a favorite microgreen and is free from pesticides. I also look for seeds that have been tested for pathogens like e. coli and salmonella.  

Buying a microgreens-specific seed also can give you more information about the variety, like taste and time to harvest when growing as a microgreen. This can be very important so pay attention to things like germination time, whether you should pre-soak your seeds, and how many seeds to expect per ounce.

Not every vegetable seed that you would plant in a garden works as microgreens.  The leaves of some plants are toxic, so look to the microgreen lists at places like Johnny's Selected Seeds and True Leaf Market as a starting point for what seeds make great microgreens.

When buying your seed, look at the time to harvest. Microgreens take different amounts of time to reach the harvest stage we talked about earlier. Shorter time to harvest means it will be easier to grow. Certain microgreens can be harvested in as little as two weeks, which leaves less time for error. I find myself constantly referring to this chart from Johnny's Selected Seeds because it shows me time-to-harvest and flavor.

Recommended

I love the smaller seeds. You get lots more per ounce, making it easier to experiment.  Greens like arugula, kale, broccoli, collards, and mustard are small and easy to grow. Sunflower, pea shoots, basil, and cilantro are also popular microgreens that can add lots of flavor to a dish. 

For more extensive list of the good choices for microgreens, I suggest browsing some of the sites below below because they have sections of their site specifically aimed at microgreens growers.  

A picture of baby collard leaves

Growing Microgreens: Collards

The Growing Microgreens series is a series where I tackle a new microgreen seed.  I’ll do research on the seed, try different techniques and report on the results here as I go. Take a look at Growing Microgreens: Indoors as a place to start if your new here.

Growing Kale Microgreens with photo of first leaves

Growing Microgreens: Kale

The Growing Microgreens series is a series where I tackle a new microgreen seed.  I’ll do research on the seed, try different techniques and report on the results here as I go. Take a look at Growing Microgreens: Indoors as a place to start if your new here.

Kale is a superfood and its special power is tasting bad.  --Jim Gaffigan  

seed packets

First seed order at True Leaf Market

I have been ordering seeds for a while now.  I probably started like most with Burpee seeds from local big box garden center.  I then moved on to I order most of my garden seeds from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.  Their selection for varieties that grow in the southern heat is unmatched in my opinion.  In my experience, the right variety matched for your climate can be the difference between a big harvest and a disease-ridden failure.    

What is a grow light?

A grow light is simply a light designed to mimic the sun.  Indoor lights like soft white bulbs put out light on the red end of the spectrum, closer to the look of candlelight. But grow lights give off full-spectrum light that is red, blue, and green. There are two main types, fluorescent and LED.